A Few Books That Explain Just About Everything

1. The Christian Bible – People are far gone when they can be convinced that the most important book that they will ever read should be read in archaic English. (And if you think that the Christian Bible was written in English, then I have a used car I would like to sell you.) Thank Christendom (false Christianity) for helping with that idea. There is more than one translation of the Hebrew Aramaic/Greek books that constitute the Christian Bible in plain English!

2. Noam Chomsky’s “Deterring Democracy” – He may be slipping now, judging by the friends he keeps (Amy Goodman, class traitor), and by his failure to grasp the Syrian catastrophe. In an article I found by Norman Finkelstein, Noam states that he doesn’t think the U.S. and Israel are after Assad! “Israel has done nothing to indicate that it is trying to bring down the Assad regime. There are growing claims that the West intends to supply the opposition with arms. I believe this is quite misleading. The fact of the matter is that were the United States and Israel interested in bringing down the Syrian regime there is a whole package of measures they could take before they came to the arms-supply option.” But, putting that aside, few have explained so much about so much.

3. Naomi Klein’s “The Shock Doctrine – The Rise Of Disaster Capitalism” – I recommend this book, despite Naomi’s hate-on for God and the Christian Bible, which, in her later (otherwise excellent) book, “This Changes Everything – Capitalism vs. The Climate,” she blames for all of the world’s woes. Good move Naomi!

4. Natylie Baldwin and Kermit Heartsongs’ “Ukraine – Zib’s Grand Chessboard & How The West Was Checkmated” – This book presents a great overview of schemes that unprincipled and influential men (only) have dreamed up and succeeded, largely, in having ruling classes, primarily the British and American ruling classes, follow, to humankind’s detriment. The one shortcoming in this otherwise great overview consists in the tone of bravado on display. I have a problem with bravado. It’s risky. I don’t consider it a good way to pump up the troops. Pumping your fist in the air and shouting “We will win!,” in regard to specific fights, demoralizes activists and those who they inspire to care and follow them – if they lose. If you don’t actually know the future, and aren’t conveying God’s prophecies, then don’t pretend (and for sure not in absolute terms) that you do. Walk, don’t talk.

5. William Greider’s “One World, Ready Or Not – The Manic Logic Of Global Capitalism”

6. John Perkin’s “Confessions Of An Economic Hitman” – An insider/whistleblower’s look at how mafia capitalism, aka neoliberal capitalism, aka vampire capitalism, works. John coined the very apt term “corporatocracy.” It looks to me like John has taken a turn toward New Agey crap. I call it crap. I apologize if you are into it. I have also read his “The Secret History Of The American Empire,” which is fine. It really covers, mostly, the same ground as “Confessions.” And I see here that there’s an updated version of “Confessions” called “The New Confessions Of An Economic Hitman.” I haven’t read it, but will. There’s been 15 chapters (100 pages) added! Will that change the book? I fear the worst. John pens an introduction to his updated book that can be found at Truthout. In it, he quotes Thomas Paine favorably. (The historian Howard Zinn does not.) I would be surprised if John has not read Howard Zinn’s “A People’s History Of The United States.” But I’d rather be surprised here than disappointed, which is how I would feel if I found out that John has read Howard’s book and still chooses to hold Thomas Paine up as a hero. As for the original “Confessions” I can’t find a clean link to it. So I’ll give you the link to his newer version.

6. Howard Zinn’s “A People’s History Of The United States – 1492-2001” – Just wow!